Untitled

modmad:

punjabi-rani:

girljanitor:

humainsvolants:

My dad said if this gets over 1,000,005 notes He will take me to… “DISNEY WORLD”
cosbyykidd:

It’s worked for white people, I figured I might as well give it a shot.


seriously i really want this kid to go to Disney world though
i want to vicariously live my dreams via a person getting a thing they want
come on

OK YOU BETTER GET TO GO!!!

I’MA MAKE UR DREAMS COME TRUE KID

modmad:

punjabi-rani:

girljanitor:

humainsvolants:

My dad said if this gets over 1,000,005 notes He will take me to… “DISNEY WORLD”

cosbyykidd:

It’s worked for white people, I figured I might as well give it a shot.

seriously i really want this kid to go to Disney world though

i want to vicariously live my dreams via a person getting a thing they want

come on

OK YOU BETTER GET TO GO!!!

I’MA MAKE UR DREAMS COME TRUE KID

isaia:

blackpowerisforblackmen:

Lupita was recently named the most beautiful by People’s Magazine, and some of their readers expressed their dissatisfaction with this decision  in the comment section. One reader even commented that Lupita didn’t deserve this title because she’s 100% black(she finds women unattractive if they’re 100% black). These comments made me think of the brilliant post made by radicalrebellion: 
White women (non-black women of color included in this as well) become offended and angry when a black woman (especially a dark skinned black woman like Lupita) is depicted as beautiful and worthy of appreciation because it jeopardizes their position as the epitome of beauty and womanhood. Black women are viewed as the antithesis of White beauty and womanhood, these white women are completely apathetic and silent when dark skinned Black women are portrayed as “ugly” and “unlovable” by the mainstream media because they benefit from this oppression. That’s why you never see white supermodels discussing racism and colorism in the fashion industry. However, these readers wouldn’t complain if it were light skinned black women like Halle Berry, Beyonce, or Rihanna (we all know why, hint: colorism). Anyway, congratulations to the ***flawless Lupita for being named the most beautiful!  

This is why this is important.

isaia:

blackpowerisforblackmen:

Lupita was recently named the most beautiful by People’s Magazine, and some of their readers expressed their dissatisfaction with this decision  in the comment section. One reader even commented that Lupita didn’t deserve this title because she’s 100% black(she finds women unattractive if they’re 100% black). These comments made me think of the brilliant post made by radicalrebellion

White women (non-black women of color included in this as well) become offended and angry when a black woman (especially a dark skinned black woman like Lupita) is depicted as beautiful and worthy of appreciation because it jeopardizes their position as the epitome of beauty and womanhood. Black women are viewed as the antithesis of White beauty and womanhood, these white women are completely apathetic and silent when dark skinned Black women are portrayed as “ugly” and “unlovable” by the mainstream media because they benefit from this oppression. That’s why you never see white supermodels discussing racism and colorism in the fashion industry. However, these readers wouldn’t complain if it were light skinned black women like Halle Berry, Beyonce, or Rihanna (we all know why, hint: colorism). Anyway, congratulations to the ***flawless Lupita for being named the most beautiful!  

This is why this is important.

sourcedumal:


"I have gotten so many letters from girls and boys who were so excited and proud to see a Black woman performing one of their favorite characters, “Elphaba”, in the musical Wicked. I was in Wicked for nearly 2 and a half years and I learned so much during that time.. .it wasn’t always easy and I was so busy in my own experience of working at the Gershwin theatre that I didn’t truly imagine so many kids would be inspired. 
"Oh, but the letters flew in, the artwork the fan sites, all the love that said "We’re so proud of you!" and "We can do it too!" I found out over the years that these things have meant alot to young people of color. "
- Actress Saycon Sengbloh, on being the first black ”Elphaba” in Wicked on Broadway.

YES

sourcedumal:

"I have gotten so many letters from girls and boys who were so excited and proud to see a Black woman performing one of their favorite characters, “Elphaba”, in the musical Wicked. I was in Wicked for nearly 2 and a half years and I learned so much during that time.. .it wasn’t always easy and I was so busy in my own experience of working at the Gershwin theatre that I didn’t truly imagine so many kids would be inspired.

"Oh, but the letters flew in, the artwork the fan sites, all the love that said "We’re so proud of you!" and "We can do it too!" I found out over the years that these things have meant alot to young people of color. "

- Actress Saycon Sengbloh, on being the first black ”Elphaba” in Wicked on Broadway.

YES

sweetheartpleasestay:

peoplehatemefornoreason:

nude-soul:

brown girls rule the world

I’m sorry to say this but if someone said “white girls rule the world” instead of “brown girls rule the world” then we’d have a major shitstorm on our hands.

You’re right! White girls (a) don’t need to say that, and (b) would have no reason to say that because they dorule the world of beauty conventions, standards of attraction, and etc. in reality. Brown women and girls are completely undervalued, dismissed, and quite often have their focuses derailed—as you so ridiculously demonstrate here—simply because they aren’t White.

So when a brown woman says something to encourage herself and others who are generally put down for how they look with something like “we rule the world” accompanying beautiful pictures of a beautiful young brown woman, that’s representation we don’t get elsewhere.If a White girl said it, it’d be doing nothing but reinforcing the idea that White women are the end all and be all to beauty and that everyone must be compared to their standards.

I’m sorry to say but throwing about false equivalences as if everything exists in a vacuum makes you look like a buffoon, and ignoring historical and present social and cultural conditions does not make your point any more solid than shooting it with a full clip would.

heru-degaude:

blackfashion:

blvckpoison:

yarrahs-life:

mixsugarbaby:

lastqueen-of:

intheeyesofdanishay:

thoughtsofablackgirl:

Wash Wesley is turning 111 years old today!! Wash is a deacon at his church in Oakbrook Terrace, and still walks and drives without assistance.

He doesn’t even look that old !

 black people out here looking like 68 but really 111 !!

Black excellence

^^^ we do this doe

Black don’t crazy

Black don’t _____

Immortality…

heru-degaude:

blackfashion:

blvckpoison:

yarrahs-life:

mixsugarbaby:

lastqueen-of:

intheeyesofdanishay:

thoughtsofablackgirl:

Wash Wesley is turning 111 years old today!! Wash is a deacon at his church in Oakbrook Terrace, and still walks and drives without assistance.

He doesn’t even look that old !

 black people out here looking like 68 but really 111 !!

Black excellence

^^^ we do this doe

Black don’t crazy

Black don’t _____

Immortality…